Windham Life and Times – September 17, 2015

100 Years Ago in Windham- W.S. Harris

“WINDHAM, September 14.— Frank Smith, who had worked several years past for G.W. Johnson and previously for other farmers on the Range, died suddenly Saturday, perhaps from the effects of drinking too much ice water during the hot days of last week. He complained of being unwell Saturday noon, and about four o’clock he was found lying on the hay in the barn with life extinct. He had a married son living in Andover, Mass., and the burial was there.”

York, Maine 1915

York, Maine 1915

“William C. Landis, of Lakeport, spoke at the church here Sunday evening, recounting in an interesting way some of his experiences as a missionary of the American Sunday School Union. He showed the need for such work in the rural sections of New Hampshire and some of the encouraging results. In the afternoon he had been at Canobie Lake helping reorganize the Sunday School at the Searles Chapel.”

“Mrs. Worledge and children are at home after their summer at Hampton Beach. The Worledge and Cochran families had a pleasant auto trip to York Beach on Friday.”

Miss Clyde's Dahlias

Miss Clyde’s Dahlias

“Miss M. Esther Clyde, sister of our postmaster, living half mile from Windham Depot in Derry, has a truly wonderful display of dahlias, having over one hundred distinct varieties.” (It must have been the cow manure that made them grow so tall. I have never seen dahlias growing at such a height as in the photograph at right.)
“Henry Earl Gilson, one of our bright boys, and son of Henry Y. Gilson. Goes tomorrow to Durham to enter the State College. He was graduated from Pinkerton last June.”

The Gilson Place, Windham, NH

The Gilson Place, Windham, NH

“From Salem Depot one can go to Lawrence by train, trolley, or jitney bus. From Windham Depot a passenger wishing to be taken to the Center, a distance of less than three miles over a good road, interviewed an owner of an auto who lived near. He wanted $1.50 for the job. He didn’t get the job.”

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