Windham Life and Times – March 17, 2017

100 YEAR AGO IN WINDHAM

JOHN PARK DIES SUDDENLY

John Park pictured with his horse and dog in Windham NH

“On the evening of Monday, March 5, occurred the death of John A. Park with startling suddenness from acute indigestion. He had been somewhat indisposed for a number of days, but even on Monday night had been to the barn to assist in the chores. Soon after returning to the house he expired with hardly a moment’s premonition.”     “Mr. Park had not quite completed his sixty-ninth year, having been born April 27, 1848. He never married, but he and his sister, Miss Mary Ellen Park, had been life long residents on the old homestead on the Range, which has been previously occupied by none but their direct ancestors in the Park name, during the whole period of the town’s existence. The sister now left alone in the homestead has the deep sympathy of all. A younger brother, Joseph Willard Park, of South Boston survives with his family.”     “Their great-grandfather, Elder Robert Park, built the house and settled on the farm in 1742, the year of the town’s incorporation. Of two enormous oaks, remnants of the primeval forest, one yet remains to throw its shade over the lawn, and to excite the veneration of the passer.  The memories and ties which make sacred such an ancestral country homestead are something which the majority of people in these superficial days know nothing about.”

The Park Family Homestead, Range Road, Windham NH>

“Here Mr. Park passed the even tenor of his days, at peace with his Creator and his fellows, fulfilling his duties of a good citizen and having the respect and good will of all who knew him. In May, 1876, he united with the Presbyterian Church and, although living two miles away, few kept up more constancy than did he and his sister the good old habit of regular attendance at morning worship and Sunday School. In 1899 his fellow members testified their respect for him by electing Mr. park a ruling elder, a position filled by his father and other ancestors in former years. His native modesty, however, and declination for public office, prevented him from accepting the position. He was for years an officer in the Presbyterian religious society.”     “Mr. Park and his sister were remarkable for being of undiluted Scotch-Irish, Windham and Londonderry lineage. They were descended from the Parks, Cochrans, Dinsmoors, and Hemphills, and more remotely from families of Wear, McKeen, Nesmith, Waugh. Lintell, and Orr— Scotch names without exception. Mr. Park exhibited many of the virtues of that sterling God-fearing race.”

“The funeral was held on Thursday, Rev. Mr. Armstrong, of the Salem Depot Baptist Church, speaking in a comforting and fitting manner, and Mr. and Mrs. Worledge singing  ‘Asleep in Jesus’ and ‘They Are Gathering.’ The bearers were Mr. Worledge, C.I Alexander, J.E. Cochran and J.A. Nesmith, and burial was in the Cemetery on the Hill. Among the beautiful flowers from relatives and neighbors was a crescent from the Windham Grange, of which Mr. Park was a charter member, although of late honorably retired from membership. W.S. Harris

 

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